Lollipocalypse

Pics, chicks, and dicks.

crowknits:

Something I’ve been having fun with lately: knitted scale mail/le!

Want to make your own? I’ll be writing up notes on what I did making these and putting that up here and on Ravelry soon enough (you might need to remind me), but for now:

1. Get scales (I ordered mine from TheRingLord.com—ships from Saskatchewan).

2. Add them to knitting! To make scales sit on the right (outer) side of fabric, insert needle into next stitch purlwise, place scale on tip of righthand needle and purl the stitch, taking care to draw the yarn through both scale and stitch.

Crafty Mutt offers some neat tips and resources for adding scales to knitting (I referred to the instructions there as a starting point but have been following my own patterns).

Want me to make something scaly for you? Awesome! Check out my Etsy store or email me at crowknits at gmail dot com.

(via fynneyseas)

fewthistle:

Joyce Bryant, 1954.
Photographer: Phillipe Halsman
(With the perfect hourglass figure, backless dresses and silver tinted hair, jazz singer Joyce Bryant became known as  “The Bronze Blonde Bombshell.”
Although the Oakland, California native was raised in a strict Seventh Day Adventist home, she made her way to the stage in 1940. It was there she gained national and international acclaim for her earthy, sultry tone and figure flattering costumes. (It was rumored that Bryant’s dresses were so tight that she had to be carried off stage at the end of her performances.)
But Bryant’s sex appeal didn’t always work to her advantage; while the artist was called the “black Marilyn Monroe”  her records were often banned from radio waves for being too suggestive.)

fewthistle:

Joyce Bryant, 1954.

Photographer: Phillipe Halsman

(With the perfect hourglass figure, backless dresses and silver tinted hair, jazz singer Joyce Bryant became known as  “The Bronze Blonde Bombshell.”

Although the Oakland, California native was raised in a strict Seventh Day Adventist home, she made her way to the stage in 1940. It was there she gained national and international acclaim for her earthy, sultry tone and figure flattering costumes. (It was rumored that Bryant’s dresses were so tight that she had to be carried off stage at the end of her performances.)

But Bryant’s sex appeal didn’t always work to her advantage; while the artist was called the “black Marilyn Monroe”  her records were often banned from radio waves for being too suggestive.)

(via fynneyseas)